Moving to Australia from New Zealand?

Get all information you need to make a successful and stress-free move across the ditch.

Are New Zealanders able to get the age pension in Australia? Yes! But there is more to it. Here is all the information you need to know…

New Zealanders who are 67 years or older and live in Australia should be eligible for an Australian Age Pension. As long as they meet the resident, income, and asset eligibility criteria.

Please note that the eligibility criteria has recently been changed, so you will need to wait until you are now 67 to receive the Australian Age Pension if you were born on or after 1 January 1957. Read more below.

Under Australia’s international social security agreement with New Zealand, NZ citizens living in Australia can apply for the Australian Age Pension (over 67 years, see below), Disability Support Pension (DSP) (if they are severely disabled), and Carer Payment (if they are caring for a partner on DSP), irrespective of whether they are protected or non-protected SCV holders.

Editor Note: I have been advised by multiple New Zealanders who have moved to Australia that there is a backlog of pension applications, and it’s important to apply as soon as you arrive, if you pass the income and asset tests. You can lodge an Age Pension application up to 13 weeks before you reach eligibility age (between 66.5 and 67). See my delay in processing pension applications post.

A claim for the age pension is meant to have a “timeliness standard” of 49 days, but in December last year, the average processing time was 91 days, up from 61 in August and 35 days in the 2021-22 financial year.

Your application will be backdated to the date of your application. However, the NZ pension is way more generous and not income and asset tested. Therefore if you are not eligible for the full Australian Age Pension, you are best to wait until you have received your NZ pension for 26 weeks and then apply for the Australian Age Pension.

Australian age pensions are asset and income-tested, so any assets or income a New Zealander has will affect the amount payable.

Income Test – Your assessable income must be less than $63,351 if you’re a single person or $96,865 if you’re a couple.

Asset Test – If you’re a homeowner, singles can have up to $674,000 and couples $1,012,500. If you’re not a homeowner, singles can have up to $916,000 and couples $1,254,500.

Read more about income and asset tests for pensions below.

To qualify for a pension, a New Zealander must have been resident in either Australia or New Zealand for at least 10 years of their working life (between the ages of 20 and 67).

You can continue to get your New Zealand Superannuation (NZ Super) or Veteran’s Pension payments for up to 26 weeks (inclusive) after you leave New Zealand.

There are different rates of Age Pension payments for single people and couples. Read about how your relationship status can affect your payment rate.

In this post you will find helpful information on:

At what age can you get the Australian age pension?

On 1 July 2021, the Age Pension age increased to 66 years and 6 months for people born from 1 July 1955 to 31 December 1956, inclusive.

This has now increased again to 67 years if you were born on or after 1 January 1957.

If your birthdate is on or after 1 January 1957, you’ll have to wait until you turn 67. This will be the Age Pension age from 1 July 2023.

Australian Age Pension age is:

  • 65 years and 6 months if you were born between 1 July 1952 and 31 December 1953
  • 66 years if you were born between 1 January 1954 and 30 June 1955
  • 66 years and 6 months if you were born between 1 July 1955 and 31 December 1956
  • 67 years if you were born on or after 1 January 1957.

If you’re legally blind and you’re not claiming Rent Assistance, you may be able to claim Age Pension without being assessed against the income and assets tests. You’ll need to provide an ophthalmologist report to support your claim.

Read more about Age Pension age requirements on the Department of Social Services website.

 

Australia Age Pension Payment Rates

The Australian Government Department of Human Services uses income and assets tests to work out how much Age Pension you get.

Working out how much you can get can be confusing. You can find a link to SuperGuide’s age pension calculator below.

Australia Age Pension rates:

Per fortnightSingleCouple eachCouple combinedCouple apart due to ill health
Maximum basic rate$1,020.60$769.30$1,538.60$1,020.60
Maximum Pension Supplement$81.60$61.50$123.00$81.60
Energy Supplement$14.10$10.60$21.20$14.10
Total$1,116.30$841.40$1,682.80$1,116.30

* Rates as per 1 April 2024. Check here for updated rates

Australia Pension Income Test

Your income can reduce how much you will get paid. The age pension income test will assess your income from all sources. If you’re over the limit, you get a lower pension. However, the Australian Government does have a Work Bonus for pensioners who do work (see below).

Standard Income Rules

These are the income rules for most pensioners.

Single person

Income per fortnightAmount your pension will reduce by
Up to $204$0
Over $20450 cents for each dollar over $204

Couple living together or apart due to ill health

Combined income per fortnightAmount your combined pension will reduce by
Up to $360$0
Over $36050 cents for each dollar over $360

* Rates as of 1 April 2024. Check here for updated rates.

Read more here: https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/income-test-for-pensions?context=22526.

Types of income

Income from outside Australia that may count in the income test includes money from all of the following:

  • Investments
  • pensions
  • employment
  • self-employment
  • business and real estate

Read more here:

Australia Pension Asset Test

For the maximum rate of pension to be payable, you may have assets up to the assets value limit (the asset limit before pension reduces), provided your income does not exceed the income free area (the income limit before pension reduces).

The assets value limits for service pension, age pension and veteran payment are:

Relationship and residential statusHomeownersNon-homeowners
Singles$301,750$543,750
Couples* – combined$451,500$693,500

* Includes illness-separated and respite care couples. Rates as of 1 April 2024. Check here for updated rates.

This means you can have assets up to and including these amounts and still get the maximum rate of pension, provided your income does not exceed the income-free area.

When the market value of your assets exceeds the assets value limit, your pension is reduced by 75 cents per fortnight for every whole amount of $250 worth of assets above the limit. The pension continues to reduce at the rate of 75 cents for every $250 worth of assets over the limit until the value of your assets reaches or exceeds the assets cut-off limits. No pension is payable if you have assets above the cut-off limits.

For a couple the value of the assets is split between each member of the couple and the rate of reduction is the same for each member of the couple.

Assets include any:

  • financial investments
  • home contents, personal effects and vehicles (a caravan)
  • real estate, annuities, income streams and superannuation pensions
  • sole traders, partnerships, private trusts and private companies.

Your home is not counted as an asset when calculating pension or payment, but it does affect how your pension or payment is assessed under the assets test.

For more information on how the assets test works and some good examples of calculations, refer to Assets Test: https://www.dva.gov.au/financial-support/income-support/what-changes-your-payments/your-income-and-assets/assets-test

Working after pension age

The Australian Government is assisting older Australians to work, if they are able and wish to do so, by offering the Work Bonus.

Seniors may have substantial income from work and still receive an Australian Age Pension. Age Pension rules provide incentives for work, including part-time or casual work through the combined application of the pension income test (above) and the Work Bonus (below).

Work Bonus

The Work Bonus provides an incentive for pensioners over Age Pension age to work, should they choose to do so, by allowing them to keep more of their pension when they have income from working. Under the Work Bonus, the first $300 of fortnightly income from work is not assessed as income under the pension income test. Any unused amount of the fortnightly $300 Work Bonus will accumulate in a Work Bonus income bank, up to a maximum amount of $7,800.

The amount accumulated in the income bank can be used to offset future income from work that would otherwise be assessable under the pension income test. The income bank amount is not time limited; if unused it carries forward, even across years.

For more information visit Work Bonus on the Australia Government Department of Social Services website.

 

Age Pension calculator

The Age Pension calculator on the SuperGuide website is straightforward and easy to use.

Simply enter your details in the calculator (in the yellow blocks) and you will be given an estimate of the amount of Age Pension you may be eligible for. Reminder: do not include the value of your home in your assets.

Age Pension calculator

Pensions and Carer Payment

Under Australia’s international social security agreement with New Zealand, New Zealand citizens living in Australia can apply for the Australian Age Pension (if over the age of 67), Disability Support Pension (DSP) (if they are severely disabled) and Carer Payment (if they are caring for a partner on DSP), irrespective of whether they are protected or non-protected SCV holders.

The residency requirements for the Age Pension require a total period of time lived in Australia and/or periods of Working Age Residence (Working Age Residency refers to residency between the ages of 20 and 65/67) in New Zealand of more than ten years. For DSP, the person must have had at least ten years of residence in Australia or New Zealand, become severely disabled while living in Australia or New Zealand and resided in Australia for at least one year. For Carer Payment, an individual must have lived in Australia and/or New Zealand for more than two years.

Reciprocal arrangements apply in relation to certain New Zealand payments (discussed below).

Source: New Zealanders in Australia: a quick guide on the Parliament of Australia website. 

New Zealand Social Security Agreement with Australia

New Zealand and Australia have a social security agreement. The Agreement covers the following benefits and pensions:

New Zealand benefits and pensions:

  • Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind)
  • New Zealand Superannuation
  • Veteran’s Pension

Australia benefits and pensions:

  • Disability Support Pension (for the severely disabled)
  • Carer Payment for the partner of a person who is in receipt of Disability Support Pension
  • Australian Age Pension

The agreement means that New Zealand residents who have lived, live or are going to live in Australia may qualify for a benefit or pension from both Australia and New Zealand.

If you are paid or apply for a benefit or pension in NZ then you must apply for the equivalent in Australia.

New Zealand Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind) and Australian Disability Support Pension (for the severely disabled)

In order to qualify for the Australian Disability Support Pension under the Agreement, you must meet the below criteria for either the New Zealand Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind) or Australian Disability Support Pension and you must also be assessed as “severely disabled”.

“Severely disabled” means:

  • you must have a physical, psychiatric or intellectual impairment that makes you totally unable to work or benefit from any assistance or rehabilitation programme for the next two years or
  • you must be permanently blind and
  • the severe disablement must have occurred while you were a resident in either Australia or New Zealand. 

Getting a benefit or pension in Australia

If you intent to or do live in Australia you may qualify for a benefit or pension from both Australia and New Zealand.

As stated above, you must apply for a benefit or pension in both countries.

Once your applications are processed you may be paid payments from both New Zealand and Australia, e.g. your payment is made up of a NZ Superannuation payment and an Australian Age Pension payment. When this happens the total amount you will receive will be similar to the amount you would have received if you spent all your life in Australia. 

Getting a New Zealand benefit or pension in Australia

Senior Services International uses certain criteria to decide who can receive an NZ pension or benefit in Australia and how much you will be paid.

You can read more about this here: https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/pensions/travelling-or-moving/social-security-agreements/australia.html#null.

Do you already receive an NZ Superannuation or Veteran’s Pension?

If you already receive either the NZ superannuation or Veteran’s pension, are over 65 before you leave NZ and meet the age criteria for the Australian Age Pension, you can continue to receive your NZ payments for up to 26 weeks after leaving NZ. If you don’t meet the Australian Age Pension criteria your payments will stop the day after you leave NZ.

You should check what you will be paid in Australia before you leave NZ as it may be less than what you are currently paid especially if:

  • you receive any supplementary benefits and allowances (such as the Accommodation Supplement or Disability Allowance) in New Zealand as these can’t be paid after you leave New Zealand or
  • you have a partner under 65 who is already included in your New Zealand Superannuation or Veteran’s Pension payments or
  • you have income and/or assets that may affect your entitlement to an Australian Age Pension or
  • you have lived in a country other than New Zealand or Australia.

Whether you are paid in Australia will depend on the outcome of your application for the Australian Age Pension, which includes an income and asset test. 

What do you need to do within 26 weeks?

To see if your NZ payments will continue for more than 26 weeks after you leave NZ, you must apply for the NZ Superannuation or Veteran’s Pension to be paid to you in Australia.

You need to apply for an Australian Age Pension through your local Centrelink office as soon as possible and within 26 weeks of leaving NZ.

If Centrelink grants you an Australian Age Pension, they will send you an NZ application form to complete so Senior Services International can work out whether you will continue to be paid and how much you will receive.

If Centrelink can’t grant you an Australian Age Pension because you don’t meet the residency requirements, please contact Work and Income in NZ. 

How do you apply for an Australian Pension or benefit?

You need to apply for a benefit or pension within four weeks of leaving NZ. You need to get application forms from your local Centerlink office or call Centerlink International Services. If you are already in Australia, here is the ‘how to claim’ information on the Australia Services website.

What you need when you apply for an Australian benefit or pension in Australia:

  • proof of your identity, e.g. passport, birth certificate, marriage certificate, or driver’s licence
  • your bank account details so that payments can be made to you (bank book, bank statement or deposit slip)
  • proof of any income and assets you have.

Things to do before leaving New Zealand for Australia

  • Advise Work and Income about your plans.
  • Make sure you have all documents ready: proof of your identity (eg passport, birth certificate, marriage certificate or driver’s licence), your bank account details, and any doctors’ or specialists’ reports if you receive New Zealand Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind).
  • If you receive an overseas pension that is paid using the Special Banking Option in New Zealand, you need to contact that overseas agency and request that they pay directly to your personal bank account. For help with this please contact Senior Services International

Things to do after arriving in Australia

  • If you are paid the Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind) or a Veteran’s Pension and are under 65, you must apply for the Disability Support Pension within four weeks of leaving New Zealand. Your partner may be able to apply for an Australian Carer Payment. To make an application, talk to your local Centrelink office or call Centrelink International Services.
  • If you are paid New Zealand Superannuation or a Veteran’s Pension and you are over 65, you must apply for an Australian Age Pension within 26 weeks of leaving New Zealand. To make an application, talk to your local Centrelink office or call Centrelink International Services.  

Transferring your Kiwisaver to Australia

If you move permanently to Australia, you can transfer your KiwiSaver funds to an Australian superannuation scheme. You do not have to transfer your KiwiSaver account to Australia though.

Contact your KiwiSaver provider if you decide to transfer your KiwiSaver funds to an Australia super.

Process of transferring your KiwiSaver to Australia

To transfer your KiwiSaver you will need to:

  • Talk to your current KiwiSaver provider
  • Decide what super fund you want to transfer your KiwiSaver to
  • Become a member of that fund
  • Provide your Australian home address
  • Complete the KiwiSaver transfer form
  • Transfer your KiwiSaver balance
  • Complete documentation of your chosen super fund.

Choosing a super fund

How to compare and choose super funds. When you’re comparing super funds, weigh up fund performance and the fees you’ll pay against other factors such as risk, investment returns, services and insurance, e.g. performance, low fees, insurance, investment options and services.

You can find out about and compare super funds by using the ATO’s YourSuper comparison tool, an online list comparing MySuper products.

Here is a good post on choosing a super fund, which goes into more detail. 

Help and advice

I’ve recently found this Australian government website My Aged Care. If you need some help around the house or think it’s time to look into aged care homes, My Aged Care is here to help.

The website has a lot of helpful information:

  • Types of care – where to start, learn about types of care, am I eligible, help at home, short-term care and aged care homes.
  • Assessment – the assessment process, how to apply for assessment, prepare for your assessment, after your assessment, when to get re-assessed and apply for assessment online.
  • Find a provider – search for a provider, compare providers, what to consider, understanding costs and setting up services.
  • Manage my services – how to make changes, aged care representatives and access your Online Account.
  • Contact us – how to contact us, accessible services, My Aged Care, and the complaints process.

Financial Support and Advice

I found this website when I was looking for advice for the below comment:

My parents are kiwis and have a house in NZ and Australia but they want to live in Australia full time now they are 80 years old!
They need advice on how to organise their finances in NZ to make sensible choices re private and government pensions, investments, house sale etc.
Is their a person or a company you can suggest that they can use yo give them this advice please?

My Aged Care has great online help for financial support and advice, including:

Organisations that can help

Several organisations offer free services that can inform you about building savings, preparing for retirement, and your pension options:

  • Financial information service
  • MoneySmart
  • Life Checks
  • National Debt Helpline

Professional services that can help

The MoneySmart website has some valuable resources to help you manage your money, and it can also direct you to professional services like financial advisers, counsellors, and legal advice:

  • Financial advisers
  • Financial counsellors
  • Free legal advice

Tools and information

There are many tools available to help you with different aspects of your finances, such as:

  • Budgeting and saving
  • Superannuation and retirement planning
  • Unclaimed money
  • Borrowing and credit
  • Payment and service eligibility
  • Bill payment and debt management

So if you need financial advice firstly check out their website and then get in contact with them. They will definitely be able to point you in the right direction.

Here is a video which explains simply about their service.

 

More questions about the Australia Age Pension?

Read the below page in full if any of the below apply to you:

  • What happens if I don’t apply within 26 weeks?
  • What if I am over 65, but my partner is under 65?
  • What happens if I don’t qualify for an Australian Age Pension?
  • Can I receive the Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind)?
  • What happens if I have a partner?
  • What if I already receive the Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind)?
  • What do I have to do to continue to receive the Supported Living Payment (health condition, injury, disability or totally blind)?
  • What happens when I apply for a Disability Support Pension?
  • What happens if I don’t qualify for a Disability Support Pension?
  • What if I spent time in a country other than New Zealand and Australia?

Work and Income page Social Security agreement with Australia:
https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/pensions/travelling-or-moving/social-security-agreements/australia.html#null.

You might be interested in…

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103 Comments

  1. Ben Gelderbloem

    May 14, 2024 at 11:09 pm

    Hi Thanks for your amazing site. You have previously assisted me and hope you can do so again. I am looking at moving to Australia.
    In the NZ Work and Income Site relating to the NZ Social Security Agreement with Australia, under the heading: How Much Will I be paid, there is reference to a formulation calculation on how much pension you will be paid in Australia based on how long you have been living in NZ from the age of 20 till the age of 65 years of age. Will this apply to me? If it does the rate of payment as I understand it will be greatly reduced?
    This year I would have been living in NZ for just over 30 years (aged 75 now), and have been receiving NZ super/pension since age 65, but in terms of this calculation requirement for the pay rate, I would only qualify from date of arrival in NZ to age 65, which is 19 years for Australian pension.
    Have I misread something?

    I quote some of the relevant paragraphs below from the Agreement:
    ‘Social security agreement with Australia
    A guide if you get NZ Super or other New Zealand entitlements in Australia or are living in New Zealand and get an Australian pension.

    This information is for:

    New Zealand residents who have lived, live or are going to live in Australia
    Australian residents who have lived, live or are going to live in New Zealand.
    Australian and New Zealand residents who have lived, live or are going to live in either country may qualify for a benefit or pension from both countries’.

    ‘How much will I be paid?
    As a general rule, the total amount you are paid is about equal to the Australian benefit or pension you would be paid if you lived all your life in Australia.

    NZ Super or Veterans Pension
    International Services assesses your rate of NZ Super or Veteran’s Pension payable in Australia. It is the smaller amount of either:

    the New Zealand rate that is based on the amount of time you have lived in New Zealand, or
    the amount you would be paid by Centrelink if you had lived in Australia all your life.
    The New Zealand rate is based on the number of whole months lived in New Zealand between age 20 and 65. For example, if you lived in New Zealand for 45 years since turning 20, you could be eligible for the maximum New Zealand rate, as long as this amount was the same or less than the amount you would be paid by Centrelink if you lived in Australia all your life.

    Formula for the rate of NZ Super and Veteran’s Pension:
    https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/images/individuals/rate-super-and-veterans.jpg

    I hope it is not confusing. It is a bit tricky to refer to paragraphs as they are not numbered.
    Your assistance would be greatly appreciated.
    Kind Regards
    Ben

    Reply
    • JJ Smith

      May 20, 2024 at 12:12 pm

      Hi Ben,
      Thanks for your comment.
      Australia age pension is a hard to topic to make sense of from the information online. I’ll do my best to help.
      To qualify for the Australian age pension, a New Zealand citizen must have been resident in either Australia or New Zealand for at least 10 years of their working life (between the ages of 20 and 67). Therefore you are eligible.
      Also since you are already receiving the NZ pension, I would not be concerned if you will get the Australian pension when you move.
      To discover how much you will receive after the income and asset tests, you can use the Age Pension calculator on the SuperGuide website: https://www.superguide.com.au/in-retirement/age-pension-calculator.
      If you want to talk to someone you can call Centerlink international services on 0800 441 248, but I’m not sure if they can help you while your outside Australia, as you do not become eligible for the Australian age pension until you have processed through border control and have an SCV.
      Please read me delay in processing pension applications post, as it includes information from visitors about when you are best to apply: https://www.movingtoaustralia.co.nz/warning-delay-in-processing-pension-applications/.
      If you pass the income and asset tests, it’s important to apply as soon as you arrive. However, your application will be backdated to the date of your application. However, the NZ pension is way more generous and not income and asset tested. Therefore if you are not eligible for the full Australian Age Pension, you are best to wait until you have received your NZ pension for 26 weeks and then apply for the Australian Age Pension.
      You can read more info on my delay in processing pension applications post: https://www.movingtoaustralia.co.nz/warning-delay-in-processing-pension-applications/.
      Hope the above helps.

      Reply
      • Ben Gelderbloem

        May 20, 2024 at 2:32 pm

        Thanks so much JJ. I appreciate your response and will take heed of the pointers you have provided.

        Reply
  2. Bill

    May 12, 2024 at 12:53 pm

    Hi,
    I am 81 years old. I’m on a NZ pension. I have no assets eg house etc. The money I have is far below the threshold.
    My son lives in Brisbane. My daughter is a teacher and is moving to Australia to start the 1st term 2025
    My question is: Is it better to apply from within Australia or from New Zealand.
    The main reason I ask is that:
    1. If I go to Australia and apply for the AAP and they take longer than 26 weeks, I’ll have to return to NZ.
    2. There is a chance of losing my Council flat if I stay away too long.
    3. If my AAP is denied, I will need to return to NZ to live out my life. Therefore I’d need to keep my flat.
    Just a short reply would be sufficient if you can spare the time.
    Yours “gratefully”
    Bill

    Reply
    • JJ Smith

      May 17, 2024 at 1:12 pm

      Hi Bill,
      Thank you for your email.
      I completely understand why you have asked this and I’m surprised no one before you has.
      To apply for the Australian age pension you need to hold an SCV, which means you need to have processed through Australian border control before your apply. Therefore, you cannot apply from NZ.
      Have a read of this information from the Work and Income, especially the ‘getting a benefit or pension in Australia’ section: https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/pensions/travelling-or-moving/social-security-agreements/australia.html.
      You will need to make sure your application is complete, so I recommend putting that together before you move.
      Because of your personal circumstances, I recommend applying as soon you arrive.
      Please note, any difference in payments, e.g. you receive more NZ pension than the Australia age pension, you will have to pay the difference back. Centerlink minus the amount from your payments. Your application date is when your Australian age pension will be backdated too.
      Therefore, please make sure you use the Australian age pension calculator so you don’t get any nasty surprises: https://www.superguide.com.au/in-retirement/age-pension-calculator.
      I have had some amazing visitors share their experiences in the comment section of my delay in processing pension applications post, which you should read: https://www.movingtoaustralia.co.nz/warning-delay-in-processing-pension-applications/.
      Please note, that because you are in the financial situation you are, you should communicate this to Centerlink in your application, so they are aware of your situation and hopefully process your application in a timely manner. However, if you are concerned at any stage throughout the waiting process, go visit your local Centerlink (huge lines so be prepared) or contact Centerlink International on 131 673 (I’ve heard they are amazing and actually help).
      Hope the above helps.

      Reply
  3. Liz Stilwell

    April 4, 2024 at 7:47 pm

    Hi JJ,
    Thanks for this wonderful site. I’ve read through but still somewhat confused re a pension application – sorry
    I am 68 years old – 69 in August. I’m a NZ citizen living in Australia since 2010. Now the Citizenship rules have changed I will be applying for Australian Citizenship which I understand will give me dual citizenship?
    I still own a house (with a mortgage) in NZ – and I rent a small home here.
    The rental income from my NZ house is generating enough to cover the mortgage and maintenance outgoings and a very small amount of income – I will likely sell the property sometime in the future. MY QUESTION: I now want to apply for the pension so do I apply for NZ pension from Australia or the Australian pension? To be clear, I’m on a SCV – not a permanent resident in Australia as two redundancies here and retraining meant I was always below the ‘new migrant threshold’. I love my work and intend to work until @74 but I understand I may be eligible for a part-pension. Thank you, Elizabeth

    Reply
    • JJ Smith

      April 5, 2024 at 11:39 am

      Hi Elizabeth,
      Thank you for your comment and compliment.
      Yes you will get Dual Citizenship (NZ and Australian) under the new direct pathway: https://www.movingtoaustralia.co.nz/citizenship-pathway-for-new-zealanders-in-australia/.
      As you are living in Australia, you will need to apply straight for the Australian pension, which is income and asset tested.
      Have you looked into applying for the pension before? If you have not, I recommend using the age pension calculator so you have an estimate of the amount of Age Pension you may be eligible for: https://www.superguide.com.au/in-retirement/age-pension-calculator.
      If you do sell your NZ property and buy a home in Australia, this will reduce your assets considerably, as your Australian home doesn’t affect the income and asset tests.
      Unfortunately, I am not a financial adviser and can only recommend based on information I can find online.
      If you need/want further assistance, I recommend finding a financial adviser in Australia, specialising in age pensions, who can help you.
      I hope the above helps.

      Reply

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